Musings on random crap redux

I’m back.

I’ve got much to say.

The human race has been busy — and not in a good way.

First, this little tidbit from Good.is

Forced Friends: Want a Job? Give Up Your Facebook Password

Side note: A few months ago, I had two phone interviews where my age came up. During the first one, the M.E. of a publication in Florida flat out asked me how old I was. When I politely reminded him that question was illegal, his response before he hung up on me was, “What are you going to do about it? In this economy, I can ask whatever questions I want! It’s my word against yours!” At first I was outraged and contemplated telling the useless EEOC, but then realized that I’d never want to work for a company where the folks in charge felt the laws were troublesome guidelines rather than binding agreements.

The second place, located in Chicago, tried to be a scosch creative with trying to figure out my age. The youngin’ asked me what type of music I listened to in high school because the company “wanted to get a feel for their prospective employees’ tastes and whatnot.” I saw right through this little ruse, however, and sang the praises of Edith Piaf and Benny Goodman. When the desired answers weren’t flowing threw the black wires, my interviewer tried another angle: “What were your favorite television shows when you were growing up?” Answer: “We didn’t have a television.” The interview was over soon after, and I was bathed in relief.

FYI-I’m not THAT old. Sadly, ageism is alive and well, and there’s nothing anyone can do about it.

Onto the article.

“Concerns about the safety of Facebook profiles are valid, especially as the company grows and people share more information on the site. Facebook has had frightening breaches of user trust in the past, and some questions about where its loyalties lie—with consumers or with corporations—remain unanswered. Nobody can predict whether Facebook will end up taking advantage of the information provided by the millions of people who log into it every hour. But while Facebook itself waffles between creepy and benevolent, it turns out some people are using the site to get downright evil when it comes to online privacy.

An in-depth report from MSNBC reveals numerous documented instances of American colleges and employers demanding that students, employees, and applicants open up their Facebook profiles for review. Tecca.com reported last year on a police department in North Carolina that asked people applying for a clerical job, “Do you have any web page accounts such as Facebook, Myspace, etc.? If so, list your username and password.” The Maryland Department of Corrections also asked applicants to hand over their passwords, until an ACLU complaint killed that practice. Still, some applicants report being asked in interviews to log into their Facebook profiles and allow the interviewer to look over their shoulder while they click around their photos and wall posts.”

Glad that the ACLU put the kibosh on the whole handing-over-the-passwords bullshit.

“It doesn’t end with the job market. College students—athletes in particular—are also subject to this invasive line of inquiry. In the new player handbook for athletes at the University of North Carolina, a passage reads, “Each team must identify at least one coach or administrator who is responsible for having access to and regularly monitoring the content of team members’ social networking sites and postings. The athletics department also reserves the right to have other staff members monitor athletes’ posts.” Elsewhere, students have been told they have to friend their coaches, thus giving the coaches total access to their accounts.”

Could you imagine being the person who is in charge of lurking around some athlete’s Facebook page? It would either be boring or frustrating — by frustrating I mean I’d want to correct the horrible grammar and spelling I came across.

More …

“To be sure, there are ways to lock down your Facebook account, even from “friends,” but should anyone be forced to to resort to such lengths?”

That’s a good question, and that is why I’m private on Facebook. It’s tough to find me and once you do, you can’t access my account or any info without my permission. Then, once you’re a friend, I’m still tough to figure out.

“In an effort to catch law up with society, two Maryland state legislators are sponsoring a bill that would prevent schools and potential employers from seizing access to people’s social networking sites. In the meantime, it’s important to take note of at least one major factor driving these insane invasions of privacy: the terrible economy.

It’s simple: In a world in which options are plentiful, people don’t subject themselves to totalitarianism in order to secure employment. They go to a job interview, and when the interviewer starts demanding to rifle through their personal digital lives, they get up and leave, confident they can go somewhere else for work. The reason anyone is allowing potential employers to treat them like this is because a job is hard to come by these days, and so you do whatever you can to get employed—even if that means having your right to privacy trampled. Illegal immigrants have suffered with this “steady employment vs. avoiding abuse” dilemma for years. Now it’s come to the Maryland Department of Corrections. When economic stability erodes, so does the list of things people won’t do to get that stability back.”

Simply put, employers can do sneaky stuff to prospective employees because the economy is in the shitter, and since so many folks are looking for work, we are more than likely to put up with all of it. Like the article states, hopefully these questionable screening tactics will fall by the wayside once the economy improves. Who knows when that will happen though.

Onward.

Some things are just too gross to discuss. My stomach hurts just thinking about ingesting this.

These have got to be the ugliest fucking things I’ve ever laid my hazel eyes upon. Looks like Mr. West is spending too much time with a glue gun and believing his minions when they spew the words “genius” and “renaissance man” in the same breath as his name. Also, any stylist (even the trash peddlers Kim Kardashian hires) who thinks this is a good look, should consider spending some quality time at Trembling Acres and give E.S.T. a try, AND invest in a good mirror. But, for fun, look at them again. Then again. And again and eventually you’ll either want to gouge your eyes out with a spork, or will want to move to Death Valley, never to return.

And last but not least, I have a feeling that the throw-up I just produced in my mouth, tastes a lot like this stuff.

 

 

 

 

 

 

12 thoughts on “Musings on random crap redux

  1. Younger people don’t want to hire older workers because younger people correctly assume that those older workers will sneer at them and exude contempt both in their presence and behind their backs. Younger people don’t need to deal with his at work — they get it from their own parents (and sometimes, if they have children, from the other direction as well. If I were younger I wouldn’t hire older people either. What you’re pleased to call Ageism, I would call the Free Market. The asshat who asked you an illegal question then told you tough titty was exactly right. Welcome to your diminishing returns and declining years in America, and wait ’til you see what we do with your health care!

  2. I think ageism has been around forever, but you don’t realize it exists until it starts happening to you. When I was between jobs eight years ago, during a much better economy than this one, I quickly realized that when I would interview with someone 15 or 20 years younger than myself, no way would I get that gig. I had the impression that younger people prefer to hire their peers, not someone that’s a member of the same generation as their aunt. It sucks, but hopefully you’ll soon encounter someone of your own generation, or someone a little older than you, in a position to hire so your age will not be deemed a liability. That’s how I landed the gig I have now. Granted, it’s the kind of job that would be thought of as “any job” as in “I’ll work any job; I just need a job,” but at least my boss was oblivious to my being in my mid-40s when she hired me. With her, my being older worked to my advantage.

    As for what you’ve uncovered about Facebook, I frankly think people lose their heads and reveal far too much about themselves on that toxic site.

    As for Kanye’s hideously designed shoes that instantly brought to mind a fisherman knit sweater crossbred with a hooker, Christian Louboutin must be resting very easy over the antics of that ego driven amateur.

  3. This confirms my belief that many people will easily resort to bad behavior and bullying. What you describe is bullying; nothing short of that. I am old enough to warrant suspicious inquiry. Ageism, while illegal, is rampant. It is a shame that the experience and wisdom that comes with age is valued so little. It takes a good bit of seasoning to know how to handle situations and think quickly to fix a problem. Who knows where this will go. I started noticing this phenomenon when i was in my thirties. I watched older friends face discrimination frequently. This illustrates the power of business in this country. Vile.

  4. Sadly this is true. I know, but I am really old.

    FYI-I’m not THAT old. Sadly, ageism is alive and well, and there’s nothing anyone can do about it.

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